Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Labour extremism eats into support at local level The resignation of seven Labour MPs and allegations of racism, anti-Semitism and extremism appears to be having a significant impact on support at a local level. Over the past few weeks, local Southfields councillors Paul Mercer and Ted Parton have been meeting residents, as they have done continually since they were first elected in May 2015, and many of them have expressed concern about the drift within the Labour Party. “This is hardly surprising”, commented Paul, “and it is something that moderates have warned about for many years.” In June 2016, the then leader of the Labour group on Leicestershire County Council and more recently Vice Chair of Loughborough Constituency Labour Party, Robert Sharp, signed a letter calling on Jeremy Corbyn to resign. The signatories of the letter stated: “As members of the Labour Party in the East Midlands we talk to voters on the doorstep week in, week out in all weathers and know that our communities across the region are in desperate need of a Labour Government. Labour cannot get into government without winning seats in the East Midlands and in recent times, we have become increasingly concerned that the current leadership of the Labour Party does not have what it takes to be electable in our region and across the country. “It is therefore with heavy hearts that we call on you to resign as Leader of the Labour Party with immediate effect. The people of the East Midlands deserve a Labour Party that is ready for government and we do not feel that is the case under your leadership. “We would like to thank you for your service to the Labour Party but ask you to put our party first, and resign”. Other signatories included Luke Smith and Gemma Exelby (Loughborough University Labour Students), County Councillor Betty Newton and Katrina Goddard (now Labour’s prospective candidate in Ashby ward in Loughborough). “Good government depends on good opposition”, added Paul, “and as Lead for Housing on Charnwood I have always valued the contribution that Labour members have made and have always listened to their opinions. Although I do not always agree with what they are saying, I have gladly taken on ideas which I think will work. Robert Sharp, for instance, played a key role in fighting against officers’ intransigence when the idea of an empty homes premium was first proposed and this policy is not only accepted as being successful but is about to be extended. More recently, Labour has suggested that we need to take action on the communal areas in our council-owned flats and again this is an idea that I have readily embraced. The problem with extremists on either side of the political spectrum is that they are not interested in using the position of being elected into office to benefit ordinary people through the efficient management of government but instead view it as a political platform to achieve revolutionary change.”
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Labour extremism eats into support at local level The resignation of seven Labour MPs and allegations of racism, anti-Semitism and extremism appears to be having a significant impact on support at a local level. Over the past few weeks, local Southfields councillors Paul Mercer and Ted Parton have been meeting residents, as they have done continually since they were first elected in May 2015, and many of them have expressed concern about the drift within the Labour Party. “This is hardly surprising”, commented Paul, “and it is something that moderates have warned about for many years.” In June 2016, the then leader of the Labour group on Leicestershire County Council and more recently Vice Chair of Loughborough Constituency Labour Party, Robert Sharp, signed a letter calling on Jeremy Corbyn to resign. The signatories of the letter stated: “As members of the Labour Party in the East Midlands we talk to voters on the doorstep week in, week out in all weathers and know that our communities across the region are in desperate need of a Labour Government. Labour cannot get into government without winning seats in the East Midlands and in recent times, we have become increasingly concerned that the current leadership of the Labour Party does not have what it takes to be electable in our region and across the country. “It is therefore with heavy hearts that we call on you to resign as Leader of the Labour Party with immediate effect. The people of the East Midlands deserve a Labour Party that is ready for government and we do not feel that is the case under your leadership. “We would like to thank you for your service to the Labour Party but ask you to put our party first, and resign”. Other signatories included Luke Smith and Gemma Exelby (Loughborough University Labour Students), County Councillor Betty Newton and Katrina Goddard (now Labour’s prospective candidate in Ashby ward in Loughborough). “Good government depends on good opposition”, added Paul, “and as Lead for Housing on Charnwood I have always valued the contribution that Labour members have made and have always listened to their opinions. Although I do not always agree with what they are saying, I have gladly taken on ideas which I think will work. Robert Sharp, for instance, played a key role in fighting against officers’ intransigence when the idea of an empty homes premium was first proposed and this policy is not only accepted as being successful but is about to be extended. More recently, Labour has suggested that we need to take action on the communal areas in our council-owned flats and again this is an idea that I have readily embraced. The problem with extremists on either side of the political spectrum is that they are not interested in using the position of being elected into office to benefit ordinary people through the efficient management of government but instead view it as a political platform to achieve revolutionary change.”