Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Gould gets it wrong over NHS funding In his latest election leaflet, Labour Southfields candidate Arthur Gould appears to be attempting to divert voters’ attention by focusing on national political issues. Gould suggests to voters that it is “important to remember” that that local Southfields councillor Paul Mercer and Ted Parton, who are standing for re-election, “support a Government that has introduced severe cuts to [the]… NHS”. “This election is about who represents Southfields on Charnwood Borough Council”, commented Paul, “and we can only assume that Gould is so short of reasons to support him that he has had to resort to making false accusations about national political issues.” The simple fact is that the Conservatives have been increasing spending on the NHS in real terms: According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), UK spending on health increased by 1.3% a year on average between 2009-10 and 2015- 16, once one accounts for inflation. UK health spending rose by 6% a year on average in the seven years prior to 2009-10, and by 2% in the seven years from then onwards. Total health spending in England was around £125 billion in 2017-18 and was expected to rise to over £127 billion by 2019-20, taking inflation into account. In 2017-18 around £110 billion was spent on the NHS England budget. The rest was spent by the Department of Health on things like public health initiatives, education, training, and infrastructure (including IT and building new hospitals). The government has recently announced that an additional £20 billion in real terms will be made available for the NHS in England by 2023-24. In its 2017 election manifesto, the Conservative Party said it would increase NHS spending by at least £8 billion in real terms over the next five years and increase funding per head of the population for the duration of the parliament. “We are trying to fight this election on the basis of what is best for Southfields”, added Paul. “On 2 May electors will have the choice between two sitting councillors with 17 years’ experience of office who have a significant degree of influence over the way in which the Council is run, and two inexperienced rivals, with zero local government involvement who would become members of the ineffectual Labour opposition. They seem to believe that national rather than local issues are more important; we believe that local councillors are elected to represent residents on local issues that concern them and not engage in national politics”.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Gould gets it wrong over NHS funding In his latest election leaflet, Labour Southfields candidate Arthur Gould appears to be attempting to divert voters’ attention by focusing on national political issues. Gould suggests to voters that it is “important to remember” that that local Southfields councillor Paul Mercer and Ted Parton, who are standing for re-election, “support a Government that has introduced severe cuts to [the]… NHS”. “This election is about who represents Southfields on Charnwood Borough Council”, commented Paul, “and we can only assume that Gould is so short of reasons to support him that he has had to resort to making false accusations about national political issues.” The simple fact is that the Conservatives have been increasing spending on the NHS in real terms: According to the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), UK spending on health increased by 1.3% a year on average between 2009-10 and 2015- 16, once one accounts for inflation. UK health spending rose by 6% a year on average in the seven years prior to 2009-10, and by 2% in the seven years from then onwards. Total health spending in England was around £125 billion in 2017-18 and was expected to rise to over £127 billion by 2019-20, taking inflation into account. In 2017-18 around £110 billion was spent on the NHS England budget. The rest was spent by the Department of Health on things like public health initiatives, education, training, and infrastructure (including IT and building new hospitals). The government has recently announced that an additional £20 billion in real terms will be made available for the NHS in England by 2023-24. In its 2017 election manifesto, the Conservative Party said it would increase NHS spending by at least £8 billion in real terms over the next five years and increase funding per head of the population for the duration of the parliament. “We are trying to fight this election on the basis of what is best for Southfields”, added Paul. “On 2 May electors will have the choice between two sitting councillors with 17 years’ experience of office who have a significant degree of influence over the way in which the Council is run, and two inexperienced rivals, with zero local government involvement who would become members of the ineffectual Labour opposition. They seem to believe that national rather than local issues are more important; we believe that local councillors are elected to represent residents on local issues that concern them and not engage in national politics”.